Organizing Your Facebook Life

(A Ready. Set. Share. contributing post on www.handmadeinpa.net)

Feel like you’re spending your life tracking down fellow artists or favorite sites onFacebook?  Create Lists – a practice I already use in Twitter (where it’s called “Searches”) to get a quick overview of the chatter on specific topics or by specific groups. The idea, and knowledge, to do this on Facebook came to me today in a Social Media Examiner post shared by fellow communications pro, Carol FingarSocial Media Examiner is a great site to follow for social media tidbits.

Creating Lists on Facebook is a good way to group Pages or Friends so you can take a quick look at their status updates without scrolling through your main news feed. It also helps ensure that you will see the post, since your main news feed uses Facebook’s mysterious algorithm to populate your news feed.

If you’re like me and have clients or customers related to a specific region or topic, you can sort those folks out as well. To keep my sources for generating stories related to the PA Wilds together, I created a list to include the following folks:

• Olga Gallery, Café & Bistro
• Yorkholo Brewing Company
• Revitalize Mansfield
• Curt Weinhold Photography
• Pennsylvania Wilds Artisan Trails
• Flemish House Art Gallery
• ECCOTA

And if you have Friends and Pages that you want on one list – you can do that too! Just create the list from Friends and then add Pages, or vice versa. There is also an option in the top right of the list page to add individual Friends or Pages, rather than choosing from a list. Also in the top right corner of the List page, you can manage your list by adding/removing friends/pages, deleting the list, renaming the list, and even choosing which types of status updates are shown on the list.

And don’t worry, you’ll still have your normal news feed!

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Artist Feature: Curt Weinhold


From hobby to profession, from citizen to champion – meet Curt Weinhold.   A photographer living in Coudersport, PA, Curt began his career in photography as a hobby, taking photos while hiking and backpacking.  With a growing interest, Curt began a mail-order photography course through Veterans Affairs (this was pre-internet!).  Soon after, he was photographing weddings and portraits as a regular income source.

Curt’s passion, however, is for the outdoors and the subjects he finds there.  In 1992, Curt had the opportunity to do the photography for the book, “Pennsylvania Grand Canyon.”  Paired with the text of Chuck Dillon of Pine Creek Outfitters, the book is now in its fourth publishing.

“I have been fortunate to visit many National Parks from Acadia to Grand Canyon, and Alaska’s Denali, Wrangell -St Elias, and Katmai NP for the large brown bears. Along the way I recently backpacked Grand Canyon NP from north to south rim & summitted the lower 48′s tallest peak, Mt Whitney.”

Curt also finds plenty to photograph in his own backyard in the PA Wilds Region and was one of the first artists juried into the PA Wilds Juried Artisans Initiative.  His photographs can be found in offices, homes, and public places throughout northern Pennsylvania.  And just recently, the PA Wilds Planning Team, comprised of more than 50 representatives of county governments, economic development organizations, state and federal partners, and heritage and tourism organizations, awarded Curt a “Champion of the Pennsylvania Wilds” award.  The award recognizes outstanding efforts related to the Initiative’s main components — economic development, planning, community revitalization, community character stewardship and conservation.

“Seeing the best of the outdoors in the US only makes me appreciate what we have here in the Pa Wilds which I choose to call home for the past 39 years. Here is a great diversity of wildlife, flora & landscapes. Thoreau said that “in wildness is the preservation of the world”. I wish to add that viewing photographs of the Pa Wilds region illustrates the wildness remaining. Let the public be aware of what north central Pa. offers and people will come, appreciate and preserve.  My fondest hope is that I can help accomplish this with pictures.”

(All images by Curt Weinhold).